Join The Interesting And Complicated Conversation On Housing

Where you live might be the #1 money factor that dictates your future

Rocco Pendola

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Source: Author / Buffalo, New York’s West Side

Over the last week in the Living The Semi-Retired Life newsletter, we did what we do best. We started and continued to build on a conversation about one of the biggest issues facing many people as they consider their presents and futures. The cost of housing and how it can make or break your financial future and plans for full or semi-retirement.

We don’t one-off or surface scratch these types of important issues. We take longer, detailed looks and consider the reality of housing — quantitatively and qualitatively — on the ground. These conversations on housing and other areas happen in my newsletter most days of the week.

Many people who subscribe to my newsletter already have or will need to make big choices about where they live and how much they pay to live wherever they end up. This might include you.

At age 48 — with act two of my life setting up on stage — I’m one of these people. To remedy a less-than-ideal anticipated housing situation in the United States, my partner and I will move to Spain. We’ll continue to discuss the ins and outs of our decision as the move draws near. However, a move abroad isn’t in the cards for everybody. So the aforementioned conversation focuses on how to secure relatively affordable housing in America.

We started the discussion with a hypothetical, but adaptable semi-retired cash allocation plan framed as a three- or five-year plan —

— You’re at or around middle age. The curtain on the second act of your life has stagehands peeking out from behind it.

— You take home roughly $5,000 a month.

— You pay $1,850 in rent, $400 for transportation, $400 for healthcare and $1,000 in utilities, groceries and other bills, leaving roughly $1,350 leftover each month.

— You have $50,000 saved. Zero investments. You don’t have a clear saving plan. Most of that $1,350 seems to disappear into the ether most months.

I’m confident many, if not most elements of this broad situation apply to more than a few people. Of course, you might be in a two-earner household…

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